Category: books

But I must admit I miss you quite terribly. Th…

But I must admit I miss you quite terribly. The world is too quiet without you nearby. I go to bed early and rise late and feel as if I have hardly slept.

You have never loved me. You have only thought…

You have never loved me. You have only thought it pleasant to be in love with me.

Regular

“I’m like that. Either I forget right away or I never forget.”

Samuel Beckett, Waiting For Godot
(via the-book-diaries)

Regular

“It was not the feeling of completeness I so needed, but the feeling of not being empty.”

Jonathan Safran Foer, Everything Is Illuminated
(via the-book-diaries)

Regular

“Have you ever had that feeling— that you’d like to go to a whole different place and become a whole different self?”

Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
(via the-book-diaries)

Regular

“Develop an interest in life as you see it; the people, things, literature, music – the world is so rich, simply throbbing with rich treasures, beautiful souls and interesting people. Forget yourself.”

Henry Miller

via @quotemadness

Regular

“Sometimes, carrying on, just carrying on, is the superhuman achievement.”

Albert Camus, The Fall
(via the-book-diaries)

Regular

“The world is difficult, and we are all breakable. So just be kind.”

Caitlin Moran, How to Build a Girl
(via the-book-diaries)

Regular

“You have been my friend. That in itself is a tremendous thing.”

E.B. White, Charlotte’s Web (via the-book-diaries)

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“Philosophers are not the people to come to if you want confirmation that the things you love with all your heart are central to the structure of the universe, or that your sense of moral responsibility is ‘rational and objective’ rather than ‘just’ a result of how you were brought up. There are still, as C. S. Peirce put it, ‘philosophical slop-shops on every corner’ which will provide such confirmation. But there is a price. To pay the price you have to turn your back on intellectual history and on what Milan Kundera calls ‘the fascinating imaginative realm where no one owns the truth and everyone has the right to be understood… the wisdom of the novel’. You risk losing the sense of finitude, and the tolerance, which result from realizing how very many synoptic visions there have been, and how little argument can do to help you choose among them.”

Richard Rorty, Philosophy and Social Hope

via @philosophybits